Applications, Products

The Baby Monitor That Has Won Over Tech-Savvy Parents

At the heart of parental sleep anxiety—or sweet, sweet relief—lies the baby monitor, an increasingly polarizing device nonetheless engineered to bring peace of mind. The Miku, which went on sale in January, is a tech-obsessed parent’s dream, combining sophisticated design with artificial intelligence to provide data-filled updates on the sound, motion, humidity, and temperature in the room. Notably, the $400 monitor can also track an infant’s breathing without requiring her to wear a dedicated device. It uses Wi-Fi to stream high-definition video and audio to an app on your phone.

 

The Competition

• The Cocoon Cam also broadcasts Wi-Fi-enabled HD video to an app, and at $150, it offers most of the high-end amenities (a breathing tracker, night vision, easy setup) in a more affordable package.

 
 

• When it comes to plug-and-play functionality, nothing beats the $200 Eufy SpaceView baby monitor. Using radio technology, which is less hack-prone than Wi-Fi, it transmits video, audio, and temperature readings to a 5-inch HD display—no app needed.

 
 

• The $300 Nanit has a premium data-driven subscription service (starting at $120 a year) that uses its sensors and the baby’s age to make personalized sleep recommendations.

The Case

Some parents prefer the all-in-one simplicity of a Nest camera, which offers HD video and a two-way talk function, even though it wasn’t designed for this use. What sets the Miku apart is its robust data set, which comes in easy-to-understand charts that put the information in context. (The device does require the sex and birthdate of the child—that may turn off those concerned with data privacy.) Built-in Ole Wolff speakers offer crisp audio, whether you’re playing its waterfall and forest sounds or using the two-way feature to talk to your tot. $400; mikucare.com

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